Which marriage counts when you want a divorce?

A void marriage is of no effect in law.  It is not a marriage at all, whether or not the decree declaring it void has been pronounced.[1]

It is not uncommon for a couple to have two marriage-like ceremonies, especially where one spouse has family interstate or overseas.

So, which one counts when you want a divorce?

Section 113 of the Marriage Act 1961 (Cth) (the Marriage Act) creates a general prohibition on persons who are already legally married to each other, marrying each other again.  There are some exceptions, for example where there is doubt about the validity of the first marriage. 

While section 113 creates a prohibition against marrying someone you are already married to, it does not expressly say anything about the validity (or otherwise) of a marriage conducted in contravention of the section, or what the consequences are for those who breach the section. 

Section 23B(1) of the Marriage Act provides a list of circumstances in which a marriage will be void, paraphrased below:

  • either of the parties is, at the time of the marriage, lawfully married to some other person;
  • the parties are within a prohibited relationship (familial relationships);
  • by reason of section 48 (formal requirements for marriages solemnised in Australia) the marriage is not a valid marriage;
  • the consent of either of the parties is not a real consent because:
  • it was obtained by duress or fraud;
  • that party is mistaken as to the identity of the other party or as to the nature of the ceremony performed; or
  • that party did not understand the nature and effect of the marriage ceremony; or
  • either of the parties is not of marriageable age;

and not otherwise.

The grounds listed in section 23B of the Marriage Act purport to be exhaustive, and they do not include a marriage to someone who is already your spouse.  

Fortunately, this does not mean that parties who have engaged in 2 marriage ceremonies need to be granted 2 divorce orders. As a general rule, if the first marriage is valid, then the second marriage is not.

In Kapadia and Kapadia,[2] Kay J relied on the power under section 113(1) of the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) (Family Law Act) to declare a second marriage (to the same person) invalid.[3]  In the more recent decision of Nelson & Nelson,[4] Hannam J found that on the basis of “common sense and logic”, any such marriage between spouses must be void, notwithstanding the apparently exclusive nature of the words at the conclusion of section 23B(1) of the Marriage Act.[5]

Interestingly, there does appear to be a distinction (largely without a difference) between a void marriage and an invalid marriage.  A decree of nullity may be granted by the Family Court of Australia in the case of a void marriage only.[6]  The Family Court also has a separate power to make a declaration that a marriage is invalid.[7]

The cases cited above involved second marriage ceremonies conducted in Australia.  The validity of a second marriage may depend on whether one (or both) of the marriage ceremonies were conducted overseas.

Part VA of the Marriage Act operates to recognise, in Australia, marriages solemnised overseas (which are recognised as valid marriages under the local law).  There are some exceptions, such as when either party to the marriage was married to some other person at the time of marriage, or when either party was not of marriageable age in Australia.  Already being married to the person you are marrying, is not included as one of those exceptions.

In the case of Lieu & Antcliff,[8] the bride and groom were already lawfully married to each other (having been married in a registry office in Melbourne some years prior) when they renewed their vows and engaged in a marriage ceremony in Fiji (Fijian marriage).   

The couple separated shortly after the Fijian marriage.  They were granted a divorce order in respect of their first marriage in Melbourne without difficulty.  However, they were initially not granted a divorce order in respect of the Fijian marriage because of concerns as to its validity.

The Wife subsequently applied to the Family Court of Australia seeking orders for, in the alternative:

  • a decree of nullity in respect of the Fijian marriage;
  • a declaration of invalidity in respect of the Fijian marriage; or
  • if the Fijian marriage was valid, a divorce order in respect of the Fijian marriage.

The Wife filed evidence from a Fijian lawyer who deposed that it was not an offence under Fijian law to marry a spouse. The lawyer further deposed that the Fijian marriage was valid under Fijian law, notwithstanding that the parties were already married to each other.

It followed then, under Part VA of the Marriage Act, that the Fijian marriage was recognised in Australia, notwithstanding that it was a marriage between two people who were already spouses.

If you have been through two marriage ceremonies with your spouse, and want a divorce, then you should carefully consider the circumstances of each ceremony, and seek legal advice before applying for a divorce.

The contents of this article are for reference and discussion purposes only. They do not constitute legal advice and should not be relied upon as such. Specific legal advice about your specific circumstances should always be sought separately before taking any action based on this publication.  

[1] Zua v Huang [2015] FamCA 873 at [15].

[2] (1991) FLC 92-245.

[3] See also Anouihl & Temke [2017] FamCA 325.

[4] [2016] FamCA 516.

[5] See also Zau & Huang [2015] FamCA 873.

[6] Family Law Act 1975 (Cth), s 51.

[7] Family Law Act 1975 (Cth), s 113(1).

[8] [2016] FamCA 942.

PLEASE CONTACT

If you would like advice in this area please contact Kori O’Meehan at [email protected] 

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State Taxes on Property Transactions – for Loved Up Couples and Those That Are Not So Loved Up

State tax on real estate transfers used to be called stamp duty- as the documents would be stamped.

Since 2008 state land transfer tax is called Duty under the Duties Act (WA).

What happens where an interest in property is transferred during a marriage or de-facto relationship by one of the parties to the marriage to the other party?

However, duty concessions can support happy families.  When, sadly, the relationship has ended and the couple is splitting up, duty relief may also be available.

PART 1: When the couple are settled and happy in their relationship

Duty that would otherwise be charged on land transactions where a couple has established a home together, is exempted by Section 97 of the Duties Act 2008 (WA).

For couples who are living together in a home that belongs to one of them, there is a saving if, after two years during which they live together in the home, the owner of the home wants to transfer half their interest to the other person, in that normal transfer duty is waived.

This law applies to all couples in de facto relationships.

The definition of a de facto relationship is Section 9 of the Duties Act that states that a de facto partner of 2 years means “a person who is living in a de facto relationship with the person and has lived on that basis with the person for at least 2 years”.

In the formal language of the Act:

Duty is not chargeable on a transfer or an agreement for the transfer of property that would otherwise ordinarily be subject to stamp duty where the person who is transferring the property is married to the one they are transferring the property to or are de facto partners of two years and the dutiable property (Section 97 (b) ) is a lot on which a residence is erected which, when the liability for duty on the transaction arises, was used solely or dominantly as the ordinary place of residence of the persons referred to in paragraph (a) (the married couple or de facto couple).

The waiver of duty otherwise normally payable, is only available if the person transferring the property is the sole owner of the property and where the result of the transaction will be that the dutiable property is owned by the parties as joint tenants or tenants in common in equal shares.

Instead of the usual duty the nominal amount only is paid, presently $20.  There will still be lodgement fees payable at Landgate and other expenses such are production fees if there is a mortgage.

So if the home is owned by George and Mary, (ie George’s ex partner) the stamp duty exemption doesn’t apply if Mary’s interest is going to Shane, George’s new partner, because George doesn’t own it outright, only half.

But if George is the sole owner of the property (perhaps after Mary has transferred it to him after their relationship breakdown, see below) then he can transfer half the property to Shane without there being the usual rate of stamp duty payable.

Section 133 sets out what evidence can be produced to establish that a couple is married or living in a de facto relationship.  It provides that a statutory declaration can relied upon to prove the relationship.

PART 2: When all is not good in paradise: a marriage like relationship ends

When a couple separates and they want to transfer property they own together between them, provided they obtain court orders or enter into a formal agreement arising from their relationship breakdown, under the relevant family law legislation, Section 129 of the Duties Act provides an exemption from duty that would otherwise be payable.

If George and Mary owned their home jointly, either of them can buy the other out and not have to pay stamp duty on the transaction.

To be entitled to the exemption the agreement reached about transferring the property needs to be part of the couples’ matrimonial settlement.  In a settlement all the assets and liabilities a couple has needs to be taken into account and considered.

Section 113 provides that duty is not chargeable on a dutiable transaction to the extent that it is affected by a matrimonial instrument mentioned in Section 129 (b) or (c) or a de facto relationship instrument mentioned in Section 130 (a).

Section 129 provides that a reference to a matrimonial instrument is to any of the following instruments to the extent that it does with matrimonial property:

(a)  A maintenance agreement registered under the Family Law Act……

(b)  A financial agreement made under the Family Law Act..

(c)  A splitting agreement;

(d) An order of the Court under the Family Law.

Section 130 relates to de facto relationship instruments and refers to the Family Court Act Section 205T or an order of the Court made under that Act or the law of the Commonwealth or another State that substantially corresponds with Family Court Act Part 5A.

Section 131 provides that transactions effected by or in accordance with matrimonial instrument or de facto relationship instruments are subject to nominal duty if the parties are separated or divorced from one another and the property is to be transferred to (Section 131 No. 1 (d) )

(i)         either or both of parties to the marriage;  or

(ii)        a child or children of either of the parties to the marriage; or

(iii)       a trustee of such a child or children; or

(v)        the trustee of a superannuation fund.

The similar provision applies for de factos except that a superannuation fund is not referred to, there being no provision in Western Australia for superannuation splitting in favour of de factos.

What Does This Mean For Me?

A couple still in their relationship can take advantage of exemptions to transfer their home from one owner’s name into their joint names.  They can obtain that relief with the assistance of a settlement agent or lawyer to prepare the land transfer and assist with preparation of the statutory declaration required to be produced to the State Revenue Office.

A couple separating and wanting to take advantage of the stamp duty concessions will require legal assistance to obtain the court orders or formal agreement required to be produced to the State Revenue office to obtain an exemption on a transfer of property between them.

The individuals in a separating couple should be separately advised about their entitlements.  Advice obtained that enables access to duty relief may be cost effective in that the costs of preparation of the court documents and or agreement can be partly at least defrayed by the duty savings obtained on the property transfer.

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The Cost of Separation – Certainty of Mind and Certainty of Legal Fees

Along with the disruption and uncertainty surrounding a marriage breakdown separating couples have to also consider whether or not they need to engage a lawyer.

Although there are many services available for couples, in particular through the Family Relationship Centre system, in most cases it becomes very obvious that both parties need to have some legal advice.

The Process of Separation
There is always one party who knows they are going to be leaving the relationship before the other. That often causes great distress when a party realises that the other one has ceased contributing to their relationship and is out the door, or wants you to leave.

The law does not give any pathway for separation. Parties enter a relationship voluntarily and entirely without any government intervention. It is entirely their personal decision.

It is always advisable for legal advice to be obtained before the physical separation, particularly if there are children involved.

While separation is a personal decision, it may have immediate legal consequences. So the first service that lawyers can offer a person when they separate is to give them initial advice.

Mediation
Mediation can be held before Court proceedings commence. If a mediation is successful, in that the parties come to an agreement about the matters in dispute, a couple can avoid Court altogether. The couples must however prepare and lodge a Form 11 Application for Consent Orders with the Court.

Mediation can also take place during Court proceedings as part of the Court’s programming of cases to ensure that, before a case is programmed towards a trial, the parties have had the opportunity of considering an agreement.

Issuing Court Proceedings
If the mediation processes have failed or there is something urgent that needs to be attended to, Court documents will be required to set out properly what your case is about with the kind of information that the Court requires (that will not necessarily be what you would like to talk to the Court about).

Court documents have been prepared to make it possible for people to fill in the forms themselves without legal support. However, most people find the forms daunting and unfamiliar.

There is no substitute for having a competent family lawyer assist with the preparation of your Court documents. That process will also identify the orders you want the Court to make and will enable you to be advised and tutored about what to expect in your Court case and how you can assist in your case.

Once The Court Documents Have Been Lodged, What Happens Next?
Once Court documents have been filed in the Court, parties face considerable delays before their case finally comes to trial. Many cases, especially those involving children, require assistance from the Court in the early stages of the proceedings in settling urgent interim issues.

Once parties have obtained some interim orders and assistance from the Court often a case does not have to progress past that point and in many instances mediation at this stage will be successful.

Where financial matters are involved parties have to take steps to establish valuation of assets and to consider what the issues in their case are that may require accounting and legal assistance.

Readiness Hearing and Trial
A readiness hearing is a date the Court allocates by which time parties need to have prepared their trial documents, issued all necessary subpoenas, and generally be ready for a trial. A great deal of work needs to be done at this time and a Fixed Fee can be offered for this stage of the proceedings and for the trial.

The majority of cases filed in the Family Court end by agreement before a trial actually commences.

Costs of Getting Legal Advice
Many lawyers provide Family Law services on a time cost basis, meaning that when you engage them, they will work for you from the beginning of your matter until the end, sending usually monthly accounts, charging you for every 6 minutes of time spent on your matter. This includes every email, telephone call, letter and meetings. Lawyers are obliged to advise clients you at regular points in the service period what is the estimate of the legal costs of the service will be. However, this is not a quote and does not bind the lawyer if the services turn out to cost more than the estimate given by the Lawyer.

At Bowen Buchbinder Vilensky we provide Fixed Price services. This involves an assessment of what work is required at various stages of your matter and providing a fixed fee for that service. The fixed fee is agreed to in advance before any work commences which provides certainty and peace of mind.

 

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact Rhonda Griffiths at [email protected] if you wish to discuss this matter or your estate planning objectives further.

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Owning Properties in Different Countries – Heirs and Places

In today’s globalised world, an increasing number of people own real estate in more than one country at any one time.

As a result, there has been an increase in the number of people who have both an Australian Will and a Will in a foreign country to dispose of real estate owned by them. The intention (subject to the manner in which the Wills are drafted) is usually for the foreign Will to dispose of real estate in that foreign country and for the Australian Will to dispose of all other assets of that person.

However, if you first make an Australian Will that only deals with your assets in Australia, and later make a second foreign Will that states that it revokes all previous Wills and deals solely with your real estate in that other country, what is the status of your Australian Will? Has your Australian Will been revoked by the later foreign Will?

This interesting predicament has been considered by the Australian Courts, which have set out principles to reduce the uncertainty that this creates and have determined that the question of whether a later Will revokes an earlier Will ultimately depends on the intention of the Will-maker: did he or she intend to revoke the earlier Will?

In Australia, in so far as real estate is concerned, such issues are generally referred to the law of the place where that real estate is situated (the legal principle of ‘lex situs’).

It has also been recognised since the 19th century that a general revocation clause in a Will (e.g., ‘I hereby revoke all Wills heretofore made by me and declare this to be my last Will’) is not sufficient of itself to revoke a prior Will if the Court is satisfied that the Will-maker did not intend by the later Will to revoke the earlier Will.

In determining the intention of the Will-maker, the Courts will look at a variety of factors, including:

  • whether the Australian Will deals only with your Australian estate;
  • whether the foreign Will deals only with your real estate in the foreign country;
  • whether the later Will is sufficient by its terms to cause a revocation of the earlier Will (which is a question of interpretation of the foreign Will by the Courts);
  • whether the foreign Will was ever intended to affect the Australian Will (which is to be determined as a matter of evidence according to Australian probate law);
  • whether the foreign Will was made in the language of that country and not in English; and
  • the terms of both Wills and the circumstances of their execution and signing.

The practical significance of this is that, if you own assets in Australia and also own foreign real estate, it is imperative that you obtain competent estate planning advice so as to avoid the risk that, at a later time, either your Australian or your foreign Will is deemed to have been revoked, when your intention and estate planning objectives may be clearly otherwise.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter or your estate planning objectives further.

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Choose Now Whilst You Can! – Your Future Decision Makers

Most of us are aware that a Will is a document that captures our wishes for the disposition of our assets (amongst other matters) once we die. It is not common knowledge, however, that there are also documents that one can execute in order to preserve our wishes for when we are still alive.

These documents are called an Enduring Power of Attorney, Enduring Power of Guardianship and Advanced Health Directive (sometimes called a Living Will).

For anyone who is addressing their estate planning objectives (and that should be all of us) it is important to consider the protection of your person and estate during your lifetime, as well as considering what happens to your assets once you die. To only execute a Will, and not consider what measures you take to protect the estate during your lifetime, is only addressing part of your estate plan.

Enduring Power of Attorney

An Enduring Power of Attorney allows you to appoint a person that you trust implicitly (usually a spouse or a child) to have authority to deal with your financial affairs.

This means that your ‘attorney’ (the person you appoint) has the authority to deal with your assets as if they were standing in your shoes. Your attorney may access your bank accounts, investments and (if you lodge the document with Landgate) deal with your real estate, if you ever lost the capacity to do so yourself.

Although this may not seem rational in reality, provided that your attorney is a reliable person to be given such a power, it is an important document that may assist you in times of emergency. If you were ever in a position where you could not make decisions for yourself, and you have outstanding financial obligations that need to be addressed, your attorney may step in and address those requirements on your behalf.

An Enduring Power of Attorney will provide you peace of mind in knowing that in a time of crisis, your financial obligations are being attended to by someone you trust and in whom we you have confidence.

Enduring Power of Guardianship

This document is similar to an Enduring Power of Attorney, however it relates to health and lifestyle decisions only. When you have capacity, you are able to make decisions relating to your own health and treatment and lifestyle decisions. For example, where you live, what medical treatment you undertake or what entertainment you will enjoy, etc.

Should you become incapacitated, you will have selected the person whom you trust to make these decisions on your behalf.

Although you may think that this document is unnecessary and when the time comes your family will be able to make those decisions for you, it is important to remember that decisions of these nature are particularly personal and you must consider reasonably whether it would be prudent to appoint particular people to preserve your wishes regarding your health and lifestyle.

Advance Health Directive

An Advance Health Directive is a document in which you set out, in advance, what treatment decisions you choose in certain circumstances where you cannot communicate those decisions at the time. The types of treatment decisions set out in these documents relate to the situation where you may be on life support or in a vegetative state. You may set out that you consent to, or do not consent to, treatments such as resuscitation, artificial feeding, blood transfusion, and similar treatments.

Your treatment decisions in your Advanced Health Directive must be followed by a medical practitioner and you therefore control the way you are treated in the event that you require life sustaining measures to be kept alive.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter further.

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Before Taking the Plunge: What are Pre-action Procedures?

Googling Pre-action Procedures will bring up formal documents that have been published by the government relating to Family Law called “Before you File” (the link to the Family Court of Western Australia version is at the end of this article).

Pre-action Procedures set out what couples are directed to do by the law to avoid going to court about their settlement, if possible.  Couples are expected to engage in family dispute resolution.

If a person doesn’t take part in the processes described in the Pre-action Procedures documents, there are consequences that range from having a legal fight when they should have been able to avoid it, to having to pay legal costs for the other party’s lawyer.

Many couples have it clear in their minds that they don’t want to go to court but are not sure how to avoid that process.

This article is about three steps to set you on the way to a successful settlement.

Your particular case: which process to use?

The first step is to provide my client with a clear picture of the processes that can be considered in their particular case.

There will be discussion about the options of mediation and collaboration and negotiation outside of those processes.  These are different approaches to a negotiated settlement.  Both mediation and collaboration is designed to empower the parties with the skills of their professional advisors and in mediation, the mediator.  Negotiation (without mediation or collaboration) is a less formal process.

The ethical approach of the professionals, the lawyers and other experts, provides support for what can be a difficult process to be as smooth and comfortable as possible.

For some couples, some water needs to go under the bridge before they can deal with issues.  Often one partner will become frustrated at the speed at which the other wants to proceed.

Often legal advice is required urgently to deal with immediate practical problems or issues, even though it may be some time before settlement can be contemplated.

The first step towards a successful settlement is assessment of the best approach to take.

Time lines: how much time should be spent?

The second step is to establish the time line that is going to suit the situation and circumstances.  Before the settlement process can properly get underway there has to be “disclosure”. The Pre-action Procedures document lists what paperwork each party has to provide to the other.

It may seem odd to be giving your ex documents that they may already have or have seen, and confronting to give over documents to the other party that they have never seen before.

Disclosure is about ensuring that there is a level playing field for the couple.  One spouse or partner is usually across the financial details more than the other.

Until there is proper disclosure and the opportunity for reflection and advice about the disclosure, a person shouldn’t be asked, confronted or challenged to say what they want.

In a successful settlement process, it is not so much about what a person wants, as having the opportunity to find out and understand what is reasonable and fair in the particular circumstances and to explore all the options that are available.

Couples who have an out of court settlement can generate options that may not be available to parties in contested litigation.

For whatever reason, a time line necessity may require fast tracking of Pre-action Procedures and a limited time for settlement negotiations before litigation, while a last resort, has to be considered.

Disclosure and Resources

The third step in preparation for settlement is to achieve disclosure and to access relevant resources.

Disclosure usually takes some time and can be complex and time consuming.  Valuations are usually needed. Consideration may be given to instructing financial advisors to assist in establishing the asset pool.

There are services and resources that can assist in preparation of a couple for engagement in their negotiation and settlement processes.

As part of the preparation to be able to engage properly, I encourage my clients to access relevant services and often to seek counselling support, having in mind that most people go through a difficult adjustment during this time.

Finally

Any person in the circumstance of considering a separation from their partner should access legal advice even if they are still uncertain about the future of their relationship.  As lawyers we are duty bound to assist you to consider whether marriage and relationship counselling might help you.

We can also reality test your circumstances with you and talk about what might happen, without you making any final decisions.  Because separation is a complex and difficult step, advice about the way to separate can be of great assistance.  It can support a process that will ultimately lead to a final settlement by agreement.

The Family Court of Western Australia website www.familycourt.wa.gov.au provides downloadable access to the brochures with the link as follows: www.familycourt.wa.gov.au/B/brochures.aspx

Brochure 2 in Children’s matters: Before you file- Pre-action procedures for Parenting Cases

Brochure 2 in Financial cases: Before you file-Pre-action procedures for Financial Cases

If you would like any further information in relation to this topic please feel free to contact the author to discuss the matter further.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact Rhonda Griffiths at [email protected] if you wish to discuss this matter or your estate planning objectives further.

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Marriage Breakdown – Keeping it in the Right Perspective

Separation and relationship breakdown is one of the most difficult situations that a person can find themselves in, even if it is not apparent from the outset.  Unfortunately, the majority of cases involve litigants who are usually at one of the most vulnerable points of their life.

It is of utmost importance to maintain perspective and composure in legal disputes. This is particularly in the case in family law matters.

In the case of parenting disputes involving the care and custody of children, lawyers are increasingly being retained to assist a party where the primary issue of dispute between the parties relates to their level of communication and understanding of their respective situations. Obviously, there are those cases where, due to issues such as family and domestic violence, addiction, use of illicit drugs, or mental health issues, the parties are unlikely to be able to effectively communicate with each other concerning their dispute.

It is important in all cases that the parties assess their ability to effectively communicate with each other, even on the smallest of levels, and take steps to address those issues.

There are also an increasing number of parenting matters where the parties have engaged one or more other professionals to assist them in resolving their legal dispute. In particular, the use of family counselling to provide therapeutic intervention for the parties themselves (and with the children if that is what is recommended as necessary and agreed by the parties) seems to be steadily rising.

The Family Court has the power to order family counselling in certain circumstances.

There are a variety of private and public services that are available for parties to consider that are available to teach strategies, not only individually, but as parents together, to assist in improving their communication and understanding.

It is also particularly helpful for parties to consider individual counselling in this regard, if they consider that they need assistance in maintaining their perspective, or indeed to assist them in dealing with issues that may pose a risk to the children.

It is also important to consider issues of a practical nature, which will impact the legal ramifications of their dispute.

A good example is in financial and property settlement cases involving clients who retain lawyers on the basis that an agreement has been reached with their spouse in the absence of legal, or other professional, advice. The current economic climate, and particularly the real property market, has created numerous problems with parties who are attempting a series of complex property transfers and refinancing in order to implement their agreements.

In the midst of all the tension and angst and possible relief of the parties in agreeing in principle, it is necessary for the parties to consider, as the initial step, whether or not the property transfers are able to proceed by giving due consideration to the practical hurdles and consequences, such as the overall ability to refinance and possible capital gains tax consequences on investment properties. This may mean that retention of property in a settlement may not be possible.

The above issues also highlight the importance of taking professional advice in your legal dispute at an early stage.  An experienced family lawyer will be able to raise these issues with you, and discuss with you options to address these issues and the benefits and detriments to you in your family law case.  They should also be able to assist by referring you to other professionals to provide assistance in family counselling, or the accounting, taxation or other financial advice that may be required.

It is important to seek such advice early on in the piece as this will greatly benefit you in your negotiations with the other side, whether they are conducted directly, or with the assistance of legal representation.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter further.

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Blended Complications – Tetris for Estate Planners

Today, there are increasing numbers of blended families, which often causes confusion and concern when decisions must be made as to who will be provided for in a Will and in what proportions. The definition of a child in the eyes of the law obviously includes biological children. However, it also includes adopted children. Therefore, any such “child” has standing to bring a claim against their deceased parent’s Estate.

An example of a child’s right to adequate provision under a parent’s Will is the decision of Mead v Lemon [2015] WASC 71 which saw the Supreme Court of Western Australia determine that $25 million was adequate provision for mining heiress Olivia Mead – the daughter of mining magnate Michael Wright (“the deceased”) – who commenced proceedings in the Supreme Court under the Family Provision Act 1972 (WA) for further provision from her late father’s Will.

In this case, the deceased died on 26 April 2012. The deceased married four times in his life. He had three children from one marriage and Olivia (his youngest child) was the result of a relationship the deceased had with Olivia’s mother. Olivia’s mother and the deceased never married.  In the deceased’s Will, Olivia was to inherit $3 million (subject to strict conditions), compared to her half siblings who stood to inherit approximately $400 million each. The Executor of the Will has appealed the Court’s decision to award Olivia $25 million and the matter is currently before the Court of Appeal.

This case highlights that making appropriate provision for your children is a crucial consideration in the estate planning process. It also demonstrates that, failing to make adequate provision for your children – even though you may not have had a close relationship with them – may result in those disinherited children bringing a claim against your Estate.

Another issue arising from blended families is the provision for stepchildren.  Until recently, stepchildren were unable to make a claim under the Family Provision Act. The recent amendments to the Family Provision Act provide that a stepchild can make a claim in specific circumstances and usually in circumstances where the stepchild was financially dependent on the stepparent, or where the stepchild’s biological parent left his or her entire estate to their new spouse or partner, who in turn does not leave adequate provision for that stepchild.  Accordingly, even though a stepchild may not be a “child” in the eyes of the law, he or she may still be able to bring a claim against your Estate.

The fact that your children and other close family members can challenge your testamentary wishes highlights the reason why it is crucial to seek sound legal advice when dealing with your estate planning and business succession planning. The benefits of carefully and effectively arranging your estate planning far outweigh the dire consequences of not doing so and leaving important matters unaddressed.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter further.

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Who Inherits Prince’s Diamonds and Pearls?

Despite achieving the status of music royalty, Prince’s untimely death at the young age of 57 years has once again highlighted the simple fact that no one can avoid the fallout from dying without a Will.

Whilst hard to believe that a superstar of Prince’s status would not execute a single document to say who inherits his wealth,  his family have filed papers to declare that Prince died without a Will. This means that Prince died ‘intestate’ and his family and the Courts are left to deal with the resulting mess that is likely to take years to sort out – not a legacy that Prince is likely to have wished to leave behind.

So, what happens to Prince’s ‘Little Red Corvette’ and other assets?  That will be up to the law in Minnesota… but what would happen if Prince lived right here in Western Australia and held his assets here?…

If Prince lived in Western Australia, there is a formula imposed by section 14 of the Administration Act 1903 that dictates who inherits the estate and in what proportions. Although each person’s intentions are different, it is very unlikely that this formula will mirror exactly what each person wishes to happen to their estate and therefore will most likely be problematic.

For example, if Prince died leaving a wife and children, the wife would receive a statutory legacy of $50,000 and one third of the remainder of his estate. The other two thirds would be divided between his children. Interestingly, the statutory legacy of $50,000 (which represented the median house price in the 1980s – definitely a ‘Sign o’ the Times’) has not increased since 1982.  For many widows or widowers left behind, $50,000 plus a third of the estate is simply not enough to maintain the same standard of living that the widow or widower may have become accustomed to whilst the deceased was alive.

If a beneficiary is not sufficiently provided for by the section 14 formula, their only recourse is to commence proceedings under the Family Provision Act 1972, which normally incurs significant legal costs and entails lengthy delays in finalising the estate.

By delaying the crucial exercise of making a Will, you run the real risk of dying intestate.  It is unfortunate when fighting over money takes precedence over mourning the loss of a loved one. To actively attempt to avoid disputes with respect to your estate, everyone should have (at the very least) a basic estate plan, including a valid and up to date Will.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter further.

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The Will to Challenge

Modern life (and the complexities that come with it) mean that we must consider our estate planning very carefully.   With the increase in conflicting moral obligations to spouses, de factos, children, step children and other loved ones, even the most careful Willmaker may find that there is someone who feels that they should have received more.  Where a person dies without a Will, it is also a real possibility that someone may feel that the laws of intestacy do not leave them with adequate provision from the deceased’s estate. 

The aim of the Family Provision Act 1972 (WA) (the Act) is to make provision for the maintenance and support of the dependants of a deceased person where those dependants do not receive an adequate inheritance from the deceased’s Will (or by section 14 of the Administration Act 1903 (WA) if the person died without a Will). 

The following classes of people may apply to the Court for further provision:

  • a spouse or de facto partner;
  • a child;
  • a parent

and, in certain circumstances:

  • a grandchild;
  • a stepchild; or
  • a former spouse or former de facto partner.

The claim must be made within six months of a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration being made by the Court.

The Court has a wide discretion to determine what is fair and adequate provision and will consider a number of factors, such as the claimant’s:

  • financial position;
  • lifestyle;
  • medical needs;
  • relationship with the deceased,

as well as other factors such as the:

  • needs of other beneficiaries;
  • size of the deceased’s estate; and
  • moral obligation to provide for the claimant.

The existence of the Act highlights the importance of ensuring that your Will is always valid and up to date in order to protect the rights of your beneficiaries.  It also highlights the importance of seeking advice from an experienced estate planning lawyer in order to ensure that all measures are taken to protect your estate from potential legal fees after your death – an ineffective Will can be expensive to your estate!

The existence of the Act also highlights the importance of seeking appropriate legal advice if you were a dependant of a deceased person and do not believe that you have received an adequate or fair share of their estate.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter further.

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