What Do You Mean It’s Not Mine?

With the increase in sophisticated financial plans and the heightened awareness of the benefits of asset protection strategies, what seems like a simple question actually requires careful consideration – what do you own?

This question is important when considering your estate planning objectives. Is it your vision for your children to take over the family business? Have you taken out life insurance to ensure that your spouse can pay the mortgage? Who will take control of your family trust after your death? When you own, or have an interest in, what are commonly referred to as ‘Non-Estate Assets’, additional planning is required.

An ‘Estate Asset’ is an asset owned personally in your name.  You may transfer ownership of Estate Assets in your Will to your preferred beneficiaries.  An Estate Asset includes any asset that you own solely in your personal name or (if with someone else) as a tenant in common.  Estate Assets can include real estate, personal belongings, shares, investments and/or cars.

If you do not own an asset in your personal capacity (i.e. in your name) then that asset is a ‘Non-Estate Asset’. Non-Estate Assets include:

  • assets owned with someone else as a joint tenant;
  • assets owned by a Trust;
  • superannuation or life insurance proceeds (subject to binding nominations and trustee discretion); and
  • assets owned by a company.

It is not possible to transfer ownership of a Non-Estate Asset by your Will as technically it is not yours to give away.  For example, company assets belong to all of the shareholders of a company, trust assets belong to all beneficiaries of that trust and superannuation does not automatically form part of your estate.

So, how do you deal with Non-Estate Assets and achieve your estate planning objectives? It is crucial to seek appropriate legal and financial advice with respect to succession of these entities and distribution of the relevant assets. Your lawyer and financial adviser will often work together with you in order to create a strategy to reach your goals and ensure that your legacy is passed on in accordance with your wishes.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter further.

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You Have Decided to Separate… Now What?

With the increase in sophisticated financial plans and the heightened awareness of the benefits of asset protection strategies, what seems like a simple question actually requires careful consideration – what do you own?

This question is important when considering your estate planning objectives. Is it your vision for your children to take over the family business? Have you taken out life insurance to ensure that your spouse can pay the mortgage? Who will take control of your family trust after your death? When you own, or have an interest in, what are commonly referred to as ‘Non-Estate Assets’, additional planning is required.

An ‘Estate Asset’ is an asset owned personally in your name.  You may transfer ownership of Estate Assets in your Will to your preferred beneficiaries.  An Estate Asset includes any asset that you own solely in your personal name or (if with someone else) as a tenant in common.  Estate Assets can include real estate, personal belongings, shares, investments and/or cars.

If you do not own an asset in your personal capacity (i.e. in your name) then that asset is a ‘Non-Estate Asset’. Non-Estate Assets include:

  • assets owned with someone else as a joint tenant;
  • assets owned by a Trust;
  • superannuation or life insurance proceeds (subject to binding nominations and trustee discretion); and
  • assets owned by a company.

It is not possible to transfer ownership of a Non-Estate Asset by your Will as technically it is not yours to give away.  For example, company assets belong to all of the shareholders of a company, trust assets belong to all beneficiaries of that trust and superannuation does not automatically form part of your estate.

So, how do you deal with Non-Estate Assets and achieve your estate planning objectives? It is crucial to seek appropriate legal and financial advice with respect to succession of these entities and distribution of the relevant assets. Your lawyer and financial adviser will often work together with you in order to create a strategy to reach your goals and ensure that your legacy is passed on in accordance with your wishes.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact us at bbv@bbvlegal.com.au if you wish to discuss this matter further.

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Landlords – Back to Basics

The starting point for all Landlords should be ensuring that they have an appropriate and well drafted lease for their commercial premise. It is a crucial step for Landlords as a poor lease or a bad leasing decision can be a costly mistake. The lease is central to the goodwill, value and future sale of a business.  A well drafted lease can avoid or assist the Landlord in resolving disputes that they may have in the future with tenants.

In Western Australia, the Commercial Tenancy (Retail Shops) Agreements Act 1985regulates many retail shop leases. Landlords should understand their rights and obligations in relation to the lease and what procedures to follow in the event of any disputes.

In October 2015, the commercial leasing vacancy rate in the Perth CBD was 19.6%. This figure was expected to grow in early 2016 as final completions of new developments came onto the market and leasing space that was taken up during the boom, was handed back as businesses have downsized.

At its meeting today, the Reserve Bank of Australia’s Board decided to leave the cash rate unchanged at 2.0 per cent. The reasoning behind the decision was that recent information suggested the global economy is continuing to grow, though at a slightly lower pace than expected. This is the ninth month in a row that Australia’s official interest rate has remained unchanged at a record low 2 per cent.

The ramifications for Landlord’s entering into a bad or hastily drawn lease in this current climate is that they may find that they have an invalid lease or they may experience significant disputes and as well as potential litigation in later years as a result. When interest rates do start to rise in the coming years, we are likely to see a large number of disputes concerning rent reviews.

Legal and commercial advice should therefore be obtained before:

  • making any commitments to lease, take on an assignment or incur any other obligations;
  • signing an offer to lease or any other lease related document;
  • payment/receipt of any deposit or other monies; or
  • occupying the leased premises.

If you are a Landlord looking to lease in this competitive market, you should begin by considering your leasing requirements with the main goal to develop a profitable business. Once you have identified your leasing requirements (i.e. the lease term, annual rent, rent reviews, etc) you must then seek to include as many of these requirements as possible when negotiating the terms of a new lease or the renewal of a lease with the tenant.

PLEASE CONTACT

Contact Les Buchbinder at [email protected] if you wish to discuss this matter or your estate planning objectives further.

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