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Some Super Changes
Friday, August 11th, 2017

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By Les Buchbinder, Director at Bowen Buchbinder Vilensky Lawyers

11 August 2017

Here we go again….!

Several significant changes to the superannuation rules became effective from 1 July 2017.Do you really need to know about them?  Yes, you do!

Not only will the changes impact on your plans for your superannuation and retirement, but they will very likely also impact on your estate planning objectives and arrangements.

Ok, So What Has Changed?

In summary, the new rules after 30 June 2017 in relation to pensions include the following:

1. A person cannot start a pension with an account balance supporting a pension of over $1.6m (or continue such a pension after 30 June 2017).

2. This limit is called a person’s “transfer balance cap”.

3. When a person starts a pension after 30 June 2017, they will have a “transfer balance account”. This will track key events in relation to the person’s pension, to see if the person exceeds their transfer balance cap (either on starting the pension or at a date on starting an additional pension).

4. If someone exceeds their transfer balance cap, they will need to take action to rectify the problem (that is, by commuting part of their pension).

5. If the person does not take action, the Commissioner of Taxation can force the fund to rectify the problem (by issuing a “commutation authority”).

6. The rectification action that can be taken will involve commuting some or all of the pension to a lump sum.

7. Except in relation to pensions resulting from the death of a member, such a commutation can generally be retained in the superannuation system.

What Does This Mean For Me?

What this means in practical terms is that where the death benefit exceeds the recipient’s transfer balance cap (currently set at $1.6 m), then any excess must be cashed out as a lump sum. This will impact in particular on those wishing to keep benefits in superannuation by reverting or paying a pension to their dependants upon their death.

How Will This Affect My Estate Planning Decisions?

There are a number of ways in which these changes may impact on estate planning decisions. For example:

1. It will be necessary to review and possibly update death benefit nominations and Wills;

2. It may be necessary to review and update Self Managed Superannuation Fund Deeds to bring them up to date with the new legislation and to allow estate planning objectives to be achieved. For example, often older Deeds do not allow for non lapsing Binding Death Benefit Nominations;

3. Where members of a superannuation fund have balances exceeding the transfer balance cap, they may need to consider setting up a  Self Managed Superannuation Fund for their pension interest and retaining their remaining accumulation interest in their existing fund. However, care will need to be taken as this could trigger tax issues and accordingly appropriate tax advice should be sought to determine the tax implications of each strategy. A good estate planning strategy can sometimes be a disaster from a tax planning perspective; and

4. Where a death benefit is required to be paid as a lump sum this may force the sale of non-liquid assets where there are insufficient liquid assets to satisfy the lump sum. In such a situation a strategy needs to be developed to prevent this occurring.

These are examples of some of the impacts the new superannuation rules will have on estate planning strategies, but in individual circumstances there are likely to be other impacts as well.

Conclusion

Estate planning is not a set-and-forget process. Rather it is an ongoing evolving process, which must necessarily respond to changes in individual personal, financial and other circumstances, as well as to changes in the law.

The changes to the superannuation rules will have far reaching effects for those who hold, or who anticipate holding, significant funds in superannuation. Therefore, for those who are, or might soon be, affected by these changes it becomes critically important to respond and carefully review your estate planning arrangements and strategies. This review may necessarily extend to reviewing business structures and business succession arrangements.

Those who choose to ignore the new superannuation rules and/or who choose not to regularly review their estate planning and business succession arrangements do so at their own peril. They also do so at the peril of their families and loved ones with potentially significant detrimental financial consequences.

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Choose Now Whilst You Can! – Your Future Decision Makers
Friday, August 26th, 2016

This one (2)

By Laura Di Cristofaro, Associate at Bowen Buchbinder Vilensky Lawyers

26 August 2016

Most of us are aware that a Will is a document that captures our wishes for the disposition of our assets (amongst other matters) once we die. It is not common knowledge, however, that there are also documents that one can execute in order to preserve our wishes for when we are still alive.

These documents are called an Enduring Power of Attorney, Enduring Power of Guardianship and Advanced Health Directive (sometimes called a Living Will).

For anyone who is addressing their estate planning objectives (and that should be all of us) it is important to consider the protection of your person and estate during your lifetime, as well as considering what happens to your assets once you die. To only execute a Will, and not consider what measures you take to protect the estate during your lifetime, is only addressing part of your estate plan.

Enduring Power of Attorney

An Enduring Power of Attorney allows you to appoint a person that you trust implicitly (usually a spouse or a child) to have authority to deal with your financial affairs.

This means that your ‘attorney’ (the person you appoint) has the authority to deal with your assets as if they were standing in your shoes. Your attorney may access your bank accounts, investments and (if you lodge the document with Landgate) deal with your real estate, if you ever lost the capacity to do so yourself.

Although this may not seem rational in reality, provided that your attorney is a reliable person to be given such a power, it is an important document that may assist you in times of emergency. If you were ever in a position where you could not make decisions for yourself, and you have outstanding financial obligations that need to be addressed, your attorney may step in and address those requirements on your behalf.

An Enduring Power of Attorney will provide you peace of mind in knowing that in a time of crisis, your financial obligations are being attended to by someone you trust and in whom we you have confidence.

Enduring Power of Guardianship

This document is similar to an Enduring Power of Attorney, however it relates to health and lifestyle decisions only. When you have capacity, you are able to make decisions relating to your own health and treatment and lifestyle decisions. For example, where you live, what medical treatment you undertake or what entertainment you will enjoy, etc.

Should you become incapacitated, you will have selected the person whom you trust to make these decisions on your behalf.

Although you may think that this document is unnecessary and when the time comes your family will be able to make those decisions for you, it is important to remember that decisions of these nature are particularly personal and you must consider reasonably whether it would be prudent to appoint particular people to preserve your wishes regarding your health and lifestyle.

Advance Health Directive

An Advance Health Directive is a document in which you set out, in advance, what treatment decisions you choose in certain circumstances where you cannot communicate those decisions at the time. The types of treatment decisions set out in these documents relate to the situation where you may be on life support or in a vegetative state. You may set out that you consent to, or do not consent to, treatments such as resuscitation, artificial feeding, blood transfusion, and similar treatments.

Your treatment decisions in your Advanced Health Directive must be followed by a medical practitioner and you therefore control the way you are treated in the event that you require life sustaining measures to be kept alive.

If you wish to discuss any of the above documents as part of your estate plan, please contact Laura Di Cristofaro of our office at ldicristofaro@bbvlegal.com.au.

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Business Succession – My New Business Partner
Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

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By Les Buchbinder, Director, with the assistance of Giuseppe Graneri, Associate at Bowen Buchbinder Vilensky Lawyers

27 April 2016

When starting a business the last thing that many new business owners give consideration to, or sufficient consideration to, is what will happen in the future when the new business owner or an existing joint business owner either wants to exit the business or, through death, illness or disablement, is forced to exit the business.

A recent Succession Report prepared by Pitcher Partners in conjunction with Swinburne University revealed that 51% of business owners do not have a business succession plan in place.

An important part of any business succession planning is putting in place as early as possible an agreement between the business owners setting out an agreed process for what is to happen when one of the business owners wishes (or is forced) to exit the business and, importantly, what is to happen to that business owner’s interests in the business.

Can’t I give my interest in a business to someone else in my Will?

Business owners are in many instances able to bequeath or gift their business interests to someone of their choice under a Will.

However, this method of business succession has a number of pitfalls, the most significant of which is that it may well leave the surviving business owners in a business arrangement with a person or persons with whom they are not familiar and with whom they may not wish to have an ongoing business relationship.

For this reason it is important for businesses to have an agreed business succession plan in place. A commonly used way of achieving this is through the use of a Buy/Sell Agreement.

A Buy/Sell Agreement will take precedence over the Will because the deceased’s business interests will be transferred in accordance with the Buy/Sell Agreement and will not form part of the deceased’s estate.

What is a Buy/Sell Agreement?

A Buy/Sell Agreement is in effect part of a business succession plan. It is a contract that provides for the future payout or sale of a business owner’s interests to his or her business partner(s) on the happening of certain events. Typically these events include such things as the disablement or death of one of the business owners. A Buy/Sell Agreement will also often set out an agreed mechanism for the succession of one business owner’s interest in the business to the remaining owners of the business or to a third party.

Buy/Sell Agreements are also frequently linked to insurance policies which are put in place where a trigger event will (or is likely to) have a significant financial impact on the business.

If you own a business and you’re concerned about how the death, disablement or retirement of one of your business partners may have on the operation of your business, then a Buy/Sell Agreement can assist you. Not only does it allow you to purchase your business partner’s share if any of these things trigger events were to happen, but it can also help you avoid your ex-business partner’s spouse or children moving into your business.

However, business owners must seek competent accounting advice in relation to any capital gains tax implications before entering into a Buy/Sell Agreement.

Are all Buy/Sell Agreements the same?

Standard-form legal documents written with generic terms and conditions often do not take into account the particular circumstances in a given case and therefore risk being ineffective in the particular circumstances and are often unclear and confusing.

In particular, the risk with standard-form Buy/Sell Agreements is that the document:

1.will not be prepared for your particular  business with all of its unique circumstances and your specific needs; and

2. may in the end be found to be legally unenforceable making the whole exercise a waste of time and money.

Therefore, it is advisable, and makes commercial sense,  to have a Buy/Sell Agreement prepared specifically for your personal and business circumstances by a lawyer experienced in preparing such documents.

What are the main advantages of having a Buy/Sell Agreement?

Buy/Sell Agreements:

1. provide certainty for the business owners by reducing the risk of succession disputes;

2. reduce the risk of the transfer of an outgoing owner’s interest in the business being undervalued with devastating financial consequences;

3. reduce the risk of the business suffering significant financial loss , or even having to be wound up, because no agreed mechanism is in place to deal with business succession thereby resulting in all the business owners suffering financial harm.

There are many good reasons to have a current business succession plan in place for your business and to include a carefully and properly prepared Buy/Sell Agreement as part of that business succession plan.

If you would need business succession planning advice or have any questions about Buy/Sell Agreements for your business, please do not hesitate to contact Les Buchbinder on 08-93259644 for further information.

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The Will to Challenge
Thursday, March 31st, 2016

This one (2)

By Laura Di Cristofaro, Solicitor at Bowen Buchbinder Vilensky Lawyers

31 March 2016

Modern life (and the complexities that come with it) mean that we must consider our estate planning very carefully.   With the increase in conflicting moral obligations to spouses, de factos, children, step children and other loved ones, even the most careful Willmaker may find that there is someone who feels that they should have received more.  Where a person dies without a Will, it is also a real possibility that someone may feel that the laws of intestacy do not leave them with adequate provision from the deceased’s estate. 

The aim of the Family Provision Act 1972 (WA) (the Act) is to make provision for the maintenance and support of the dependants of a deceased person where those dependants do not receive an adequate inheritance from the deceased’s Will (or by section 14 of the Administration Act 1903 (WA) if the person died without a Will). 

The following classes of people may apply to the Court for further provision:

  • a spouse or de facto partner;
  • a child;
  • a parent

and, in certain circumstances:

  • a grandchild;
  • a stepchild; or
  • a former spouse or former de facto partner.

The claim must be made within six months of a Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration being made by the Court.

The Court has a wide discretion to determine what is fair and adequate provision and will consider a number of factors, such as the claimant’s:

  • financial position;
  • lifestyle;
  • medical needs;
  • relationship with the deceased,

as well as other factors such as the:

  • needs of other beneficiaries;
  • size of the deceased’s estate; and
  • moral obligation to provide for the claimant.

The existence of the Act highlights the importance of ensuring that your Will is always valid and up to date in order to protect the rights of your beneficiaries.  It also highlights the importance of seeking advice from an experienced estate planning lawyer in order to ensure that all measures are taken to protect your estate from potential legal fees after your death – an ineffective Will can be expensive to your estate!

The existence of the Act also highlights the importance of seeking appropriate legal advice if you were a dependant of a deceased person and do not believe that you have received an adequate or fair share of their estate.

Please contact Laura Di Cristofaro of our office at ldicristofaro@bbvlegal.com.au if you would like to have a discussion about Family Provision claims or your estate planning requirements.

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What Happens if you Die Just Before Signing your Will?
Friday, November 20th, 2015

This one (3)

By Daniel Yazdani, Solicitor at Bowen Buchbinder Vilensky Lawyers

18 November 2015

The recent WA decision of Re The Estate of Allan John Young [2015] WASC 409, which was handed down on 3 November 2015, deals with the interesting question of what happens if a person unexpectedly dies before signing his or her Will. Is the unsigned document valid? Can the unsigned document be admitted to Probate, thereby allowing the Executor to administer the Estate as per the Will?

Briefly, the facts of the case were that Allan Young (‘the deceased’) lived in Hopetoun, WA and had his Will prepared by lawyers in Perth. Just a few days before his unexpected death, he spoke with his accountant and said words to the effect: “I have read the documents and I am happy with it as long as you are happy.” The accountant replied that he had no problems with the Will. On 21 May 2014 – the day before he died – he spoke with one of his neighbours whom he would see daily. He told her that he had decided to sign his new will, saying: “I suppose I’m going to sign this will … I will get it finished.” The next day, he died.

Given that the deceased had not signed the Will, it did not satisfy one of the fundamental statutory requirements in the Wills Act 1970 (WA) – namely, the need for the deceased to sign the Will and have his signature witnessed by 2 people. Thus, the only way in which this unsigned Will could be admitted to Probate was if it satisfied the requirements of being an ‘Informal Will’ under s 32(2) of the Wills Act 1970 (WA). In order to be admitted as an Informal Will in WA, the Court must be satisfied that the deceased intended the document to constitute his last Will.

In the end, the Supreme Court was satisfied that the document in question was an Informal Will and ordered that the Informal Will be admitted to Probate.

This interesting case highlights a number of points, including:

  • A Will should be signed as soon as possible after it has been prepared and settled;
  • The importance of having a validly signed and current Will – this will minimise the costs arising from court proceedings to try and prove a document as an Informal Will;
  • Whilst Informal Wills can be admitted to Probate in some circumstances, there needs to be clear and cogent evidence that the draft Will or other documents reflect the deceased’s testamentary intentions; otherwise it is unlikely that such a document will be admitted to Probate. Therefore, in some instances, the failure to have a validly signed Will (even if it has been drafted) will result in an intestacy and the Estate being divided up according to the intestacy rules in the Administration Act 1903 (WA).

For more information on this subject or to discuss your Will and Estate Planning requirements, contact our Daniel Yazdani at dyazdani@bbvlegal.com.au.

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